Ron Au

Web development and multimedia doer πŸ¦†
πŸ€—
Ex-journo, current multimedia officer, future web dev.
Was writing this in a reply but I think it's so simple yet powerful that it's worth highlighting. By nature I'm reticent to spotlight myself and I get serious whoDoIThinkIAm-itis whenever I discourse with peers.

However, recently I watched Jeff Atwood's How To Stop Sucking And Be Awesome Instead where this point resonated:

If your thing in public isn't awesome enough that's okay. People basically don't remember the things that you posted that weren't that useful to them, as long as they weren't harmful. The important thing is they do remember successes intensely. In fact they forget all your failures immediately and they go right to your successesβ€” that's all you'll be remembered for so just bear that in mind. That's the way people's minds work: they remember the things you did that helped them and then they'll very, very conveniently forget all the things you did that weren't that interesting.
swyx also made this remark ('hustle' referring to heavy self-promoting):

the only thing i'm sure of is that zero hustle is definitely underselling yourself. our internet culture/economy inherently rewards people who put themselves out there, doubly so if you show up every day and people can see your authentic growth.
I think they pair together powerfully to make you think "why aren't I learning in public more?"